LATEST ARTICLES

Landmark case raises prospect of Australian gambling reform

Landmark case raises prospect of Australian gambling reform

A landmark legal case in Australia has highlighted how Australians have become among the world’s most extravagant gamblers, last year losing a total of nearly $23 billion Australian dollars ($17.65 billion) on gambling and A$11.6 billion on gaming machines (excluding those in casinos), according to Australian government statistics.

Scientist says Southeast Asia not admitting to Zika spread

Scientist says Southeast Asia not admitting to Zika spread

The Zika virus is far more prevalent in Southeast Asia than many nations are willing to admit, according to a leading Australian scientist. Scott O’Neill, dean of science at Monash University in Melbourne, said Asian nations might be in denial regarding concerns that Zika could threaten their tourism revenue.

Australia sharpens its claws in war on feral felines

Australia sharpens its claws in war on feral felines

A multi-pronged campaign to control feral cat numbers is underway in Australia, with the commercial rollout of a new poison bait in coming months, the development of more sophisticated trapping devices, and the increasing use of dogs to both guard vulnerable native animal populations and to hunt down the felines.

Our security is important but our freedom is precious

Our security is important but our freedom is precious

In the aftermath of the Sydney siege and the Paris shootings, and in light of the growing might and reach of Islamic State, Boko Haram, and other terror movements, US President Barack Obama is talking tough. In his State of the Union speech last week, President Obama said the US stands united with all those …read more

Hunting the hunters

Hunting the hunters

On the hunt, ready to kill, she emerges from behind the rock pile at dusk; eyes gleaming green, tail twitching. As heavy as ten kilos and remarkably agile for her size, she has spent the day hiding from the sun in a den under some boulders, or maybe in a sandy hollow under some scrub. …read more

The northern front in the war on dengue

The northern front in the war on dengue

Far North Queensland’s wet season begins with a drumroll of heavy raindrops splattering on roofs and sidewalks and the inevitable arrival of hordes of newly hatched mosquitoes. Floating in and around houses and yards, these tiny blood-suckers are on a relentless search for unprotected human flesh.

The mosquito solution

The mosquito solution

Hungry mosquitos float out into the steamy air as soon as Sularto snaps open the container lid. Blowing the insects gently on their way, as gently as he might blow on a spoonful of hot soup, the stocky Indonesian waits for a minute before hitching his denim bag more securely onto his shoulder and setting …read more

Kindness of Strangers

Kindness of Strangers

Aung Lin Tin is a tiny, struggling scrap of humanity. Born six weeks prematurely, he weighed 1.08 kilograms when he arrived. He couldn’t suckle. He had a fever. He lost more weight in his first days of life. His mother, Tin Zar, is 24 years old and a Karen – one of the long-battling people …read more

Closing the net

Closing the net

The deadliest creature in the world can be squashed with a casual slap. Yet the tiny mosquito still manages to kill hundreds of thousands of people a year with the diseases it carries: malaria, dengue, Japanese encephalitis and yellow fever. Now it seems science is getting closer to controlling some of the mosquito’s cargo of …read more

An Australian-Balinese princess

An Australian-Balinese princess

A princess clad in bright silks and an elaborate gold headdress or a young Sydney professional, poised and tailored, sipping a cocktail in an up-market city bar? Maya Kerthyasa is both Balinese princess and Australian professional. Now 22 years old and a staff writer employed by the glossy Australian Gourmet Traveller magazine, she skims from …read more