LATEST ARTICLES

Dos and don’ts: how to hire a university boss

Dos and don’ts: how to hire a university boss

“When you start recruiting, don’t stuff it up” was the pithy message from departing Queensland University of Technology vice-chancellor Peter Coaldrake to the institution’s chancellor, the venerable philanthropist and pastoralist Tim Fairfax.

It’s smoking, but not as we’ve known it

It’s smoking, but not as we’ve known it

The crowded medical products aisle of the Woolworths supermarket in Sydney’s working-class suburb of Eastlakes offers a selection of nicotine products to passing consumers. Crammed on the shelf above the heartburn products is a range of quit smoking aids: nicotine gum, nicotine lozenges, nicotine patches and nicotine mouth spray.

Bowmans seize their moment to travel the world

Bowmans seize their moment to travel the world

In November, Central Queensland University vice-chancellor Scott Bowman signed a contract for another five-year term at the helm of the sprawling regional institution, but over Christmas he and his wife, Anita Bowman, changed their minds.

Sheil keen to break down gender barriers as QUT vice-chancellor

Sheil keen to break down gender barriers as QUT vice-chancellor

Margaret Sheil’s reputation as a gender warrior preceded her at the Queensland University of Technology. Only a few months after she began in the top job, women academics have already contacted her with an eye to moving to QUT. “I’ve been approached now by women from other places,” she says. “They’ve been saying, ‘we know …read more

Doing the devil’s work

Doing the devil's work

Finally, hearts thumping, they tipped their first south-western devil out of the trap: a hefty, healthy older male, with a thick coat and excellent teeth. Best of all, his face was clear and clean — he was cancer-free.

Challenging the maladies

Challenging the maladies

Not to spoil the story too much but the answer appears to be yes. You can die of a broken heart. Nikki Stamp, one of Australia’s few female heart and lung surgeons, loves the muscly organ that sits somewhere under the ribs. She admires its versatility and endurance and marvels at its influence on the …read more

Alexis Wright’s Stella-winning Tracker nurtured at WSU

Alexis Wright’s Stella-winning Tracker nurtured at WSU

A university writing centre and an academic research grant gave the indigenous writer Alexis Wright the space and time to write Tracker, a prize-winning book with an innovative and particularly indigenous perspective on biography.

Great progress, but gaps remain

Great progress, but gaps remain

Professor Margaret Gardner has been watching women’s progress in academia for many decades. These days, as vice-chancellor of Monash University and chair of Universities Australia, she can push hard for gender parity in her own institution and influence the whole of Australia’s tertiary education sector.

China pressures Australia through higher education sector

China pressures Australia through higher education sector

Escalating signs that China is using its $9 billion annual spend by international students as leverage in its increasingly tense relations with Australia has prompted rapid action in Canberra to try to limit the damage in one of the ­nation’s most lucrative export markets.

Fine line between relief and craving in opioid war

Fine line between relief and craving in opioid war

Natalie Elliott is fed up with being treated like a drug addict. From Werribee in Melbourne, the 35-year-old has endured a range of serious medical conditions for most of her life, including the incurable Complex Regional Pain Syndrome and severe degeneration in her cervical spine (in her neck) requiring a spinal fusion, as well as …read more